The Four-D Time Management Trick to Boost Your Efficiency

Time is our most precious personal resource; once we’ve spent it, we’ll never get it back. As busy entrepreneurs, we seem to have less time than anyone else, so it just makes sense to look for ways to use our time wisely. Here is one technique that has worked for many.

The Four D’s

When you think about it, there are only four actions you can take against any one of the many tasks you have on your plate:

  1. Do it.
  2. Delegate it.
  3. Delay it.
  4. Delete it.

As you approach each task on your to-do list, ask yourself which one of the four D’s is best.

Do It

The first option is simply to do the task yourself.  Get it done, checked off, and out of the way.  This is often the best option if it’s urgent, important, or you are the only one with the experience and training to do it.

It might sound counter-intuitive at first, but doing a task might not be the best option. Let’s look at the other three options before we decide.

Delegate It

If your to-do list is full of simple, routine actions, then delegating is a strong choice. Delegating is also a great choice for tasks that are beyond your skill set and that would take too much learning-curve time away from your core work. If you don’t have time to do everything yourself, then getting help is a smart alternative to doing it yourself.

Getting help doesn’t mean you have to hire a full-time employee. You can get help in a multitude of ways:

  • Engage a company to do a task. From walking dogs to managing Google Ad campaigns to handling your bookkeeping and taxes, there are companies like ours that would be delighted to take over your task for you.
  • Automation is a form of delegation. Can software do what you are doing?
  • Find someone on Fiverr.com or UpWork. You can hire someone for a five-minute task or a 5-day task. Find them on any website that lists freelancers for hire.
  • Plenty of people are looking for part-time jobs, just in case you don’t have enough work for a full-time person.

If you can write instructions about how to perform the task, you can delegate it. And if you’re worried about losing control or quality, simply add milestones where you check the person’s work. Initially, it might not be faster, but in the long term, it will pay off.

Delay It

If a task is not urgent or important, delaying it might be the right option. The problem with this option is that you have to handle the task at least twice: once when reviewing it and deciding whether to do it, and again when you finally decide to do it.  If you keep deciding to delay it, you’ve handled it more than twice. Not only can this take up precious time, it can be a drain on your energy as you see the incomplete task on your to-do list for a long time.

However, there are times when delaying a task is best:

  • Delay if it’s not urgent and you have other urgent items to attend to.
  • Delay if it’s not important.
  • Delay to prioritize other, more profitable tasks first.
  • Delay when the task is best done in batches. Here’s an example: Rather than answer each email as it comes in, think about blocking out three times a day where you check and clear your email. You can apply this time-batching concept to just about everything to gain efficiency: posting on social media (write and schedule a month’s worth in advance), returning phone calls, attending meetings (book them all on one day and keep other days clear), and running errands (delay until you have three to four errands, then do them all in one run.

Be careful of delaying a task over and over again.  Something else may be going on with your mindset:

  • The task may be uncomfortable for you (find someone that loves to do what you don’t and delegate), or
  • How to get started is ambiguous (get training or find someone experienced to shorten your learning curve).

Delete It

Some tasks should never have been added to your to-do-list in the first place. When there is no return on investment for a task, perhaps the best choice is to delete it.

Take a look at some of the things you do out of habit. Does it still make sense to do that task, or is it simply done because it was always done that way?

Do, Delegate, Delay, Delete

Try the four-D time management trick for yourself to get an instant boost in efficiency and productivity.

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Gearing Up for Holiday Sales: 2021 Trends and Opportunities

The 2021 holiday sales season will give businesses a chance to continue their online migration from 2020 trends, with opportunities for more refinement and improvements.  The key is to bring as much as possible online and integrate all of your customer touch points into an omnichannel of positive experiences.

Let’s take a look at some trends in retail that we can apply to many other industries. These trends will strengthen our businesses and position us well for the future.

Strong E-Commerce Presence

As people increased online shopping and delivery last year, the trend is expected to continue beyond the pandemic. For this reason, all businesses should strengthen their online presence, especially their e-commerce presence.

Many retail establishments benefit from a complete ecommerce solution, including a storefront, shopping cart, online payment process, and automated fulfillment. They can expand their online effectiveness with these features:

  • Enable chat features between customers and store clerks to simulate the conversation the customer might experience in the physical store
  • For clothing, post detailed sizing charts, imitate the dressing room mirror with try-on automation, and use photos of models in all shapes and sizes
  • Create how-to videos to show customers ways to effectively use the product
  • Expand photography so customers can see all angles of the product as well as how it can be used
  • Display and sort user reviews to help customers decide
  • Implement clear navigation and search options so customers can find what they want. Today, many customers research online, then visit the physical location to finalize their transaction.

Expanding your business’s e-commerce presence doesn’t just apply to retail. For example, businesses in the services space have implemented appointment-setting and payment processing. Real estate agents have enhanced virtual home tours. Many businesses with physical goods and documents have beefed up delivery options and implemented curbside pickup.

Each business has a unique sales cycle that a customer goes through when purchasing goods and services. The question for business owners to ask is how they can bring most of that experience online.

Mobile

The vast majority of transactions are now occurring on mobile devices. If your business’s mobile presence is not optimal, then you’ll want to make that a priority this year to catch up with your competitors.

Social

More and more consumers are using social media channels – Instagram, YouTube, TikTok, Snapchat, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Twitter, Clubhouse, and Facebook — to discover and purchase items that delight them. Wise business owners will invest more budget into attracting customers from this channel.

Holiday Seasons

With the move to online shopping, the holiday season has been extended from just one day or one weekend to entire months. Consumers are shopping earlier and all year long. Retailers and other businesses can benefit by always having some kind of sale or attraction going on. Here are the key holidays for the fourth quarter:

  • Columbus Day
  • Halloween, the second most profitable holiday (Christmas is first)
  • Veterans Day
  • Thanksgiving Day
  • Black Friday
  • Small Business Saturday
  • Hanukkah
  • Cyber Monday
  • Christmas Eve
  • Christmas Day
  • Boxing Day
  • Kwanzaa
  • New Year’s Eve

How does your business fare when it comes to a fully online experience? Use these trends to boost sales growth in 2021 and beyond.

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Making Customers Pay… You

If you grant credit to customers or take recurring credit card payments, the unexpected can happen: a customer fails to pay on time, the credit card expires, or the check bounces. What can a business owner do to spend as little time as possible on these items but get the cash collected?  Plenty.  Here are our ideas:

Re-examine your credit policy

Is there any way you can have credit customers pay up front? Perhaps you can collect a deposit to minimize your risk. Perhaps you can request final payment right before you deliver the final product.  Perhaps you can convert credit terms to a layaway situation, like they use in retail.

The best way to speed up collections is to change your payment terms if at all possible.

Be proactive

If the client is late with a payment, respond quickly.  Send them proactive reminders. Give them a call just before the payment is due if you have this luxury.

If the customer pays by credit card, monitor credit card expiration dates, and send reminders to update the card before it expires.

Make it easy and clear on your website support section how a customer can update their credit card number on file at any time. Automating this process will save you a ton of time.

Payment failures and disputes

It’s inevitable that you will experience customers whose credit card payments, ACH withdrawals, and checks fail or bounce. As a business owner, you need to have solid procedures for you or your employees to process these exceptions.

When a credit card payment fails, make sure your shopping cart, merchant account, or gateway processor notifies you of the failure. Contact the customer right away to correct the situation. The same is true of bounced checks or failed ACH deposits. Assess any extra fees and flag the customer account if you want to place any future payment or credit restrictions on them.

You may also have customers that report disputes to their credit card company. Respond timely to these transactions as there is always a tight deadline, and make sure you have all of the documentation you need at the time of sale if this comes up.

Develop solid collections processes

If the payment is late, start your collections routine.  Send out friendly reminders at first; then get progressively aggressive as the payment grows later and later.

Follow-up steps are very important. Make sure your customer is getting your notifications, and give them a call before you have to take legal steps with them.

Finally, if necessary, turn the payment over to a collections agency who can impact the customer’s credit report and possibly collect your money.

We hope you do not have too much of this activity in your business. But if you do, being proactive is a great way to reduce it. Check to see if you have all the processes described above in place to handle collections in your business so that your cash continues to flow.

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Six Things to Look for Every Month in Your Accounting Reports

While Net Profit and your cash balance are probably the first two numbers you look at on your monthly Profit and Loss Statement, don’t stop there.  There are a lot more gems you can glean if you dig a little deeper and look through the following six lenses at your data.

  1. Automation Opportunities

Look at your labor detail reports as well as professional and outsourcing expenses to see what areas might be ripe for automating.  Is your admin spending too much time scheduling meetings?  If so, automate everyone’s calendars.  Are you finding places where duplicate data-entry is driving up costs?  Get Zapier or another integration solution.

On the flip side, cancel tech spending where you are no longer using the app and get those expenses off your books.

  1. Duplicate or Excessive Expenses

Where are you paying for things twice on your Profit and Loss Statement?  Where could you scale down?  As an example, if you are renting 5,000 square feet but now only need 2,000 because everyone wants to work from home, see if you can re-negotiate your lease or sublet that extra space.

Do you have redundancy in your insurance policies? Perhaps your liability and your business umbrella both cover workers compensation.  See what you can do to reduce the overlap.

You might only need three phone lines but are paying for five.  Retainer and recurring expenses should be inspected carefully; are you getting what you’re paying for?

  1. Outsourcing Opportunities

Are their companies that can do tasks or work cheaper and better than how you are doing them now?  If so, outsourcing could be a profitable option to look into further.

  1. Indications of Fraud, Theft, or Excessive Risk

As owners, we need to protect our business investment, and we should always be on the lookout for signs that our investment may be at risk.  If your numbers look odd or unexpected, you should be skeptical and investigate further.

  1. Tax Savings Situations

Investing in tax planning almost always yields great results, especially this year with new tax relief available to qualifying businesses. Get help from a tax professional to see if you qualify or are close to qualifying for tax deductions, credits, and savings.

  1. Sales Growth

This list would be remiss without mentioning the obvious opportunities of finding ways to grow sales. Your sales results can give you an idea of where more growth can occur, where promotion opportunities exist, and where completely new revenue sources can be created.

After you’ve examined your cash number and your net profit, try these six new filters to get even more ideas to run your business better.

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Help Wanted: You Have Options!

Many people have complained about the worker shortages this year. If you need additional workers in order to grow your business, here are some ideas for your consideration.

Where to Look for Workers

We may think of workers as only being employees, but there are a lot more options if you’re open-minded.  Here’s a list of places to find workers of all kinds:

  • Recruiters
  • Employment agencies
  • Online job portals, such as Indeed, SimplyHired, and ZipRecruiter.
  • Social media, including LinkedIn Jobs
  • Your own website, email list, or employee referrals
  • Temp agencies
  • Specialized online job portals that cater to your industry and business type
  • Virtual assistant organizations
  • Day labor online sites and pickup areas
  • Job matching sites such as Upwork, Fiverr, and Freelancer.
  • Colleges, when you need interns and entry-level workers
  • Your local unemployment office
  • Small business development centers
  • Virtual assistant agencies or businesses
  • Chambers of Commerce and other business organizations
  • Professional organization directories where a license is needed, such as hair stylists, dentists, or CPAs
  • Friends, colleagues, competitors, and neighbors; your own personal or business network
  • Craigslist and local classified ads
  • High school guidance counselors if you want to hire straight out of high school
  • Outsourcing to a company that provides the labor that does what you need
  • Volunteer matching sites

Options for Adding Workers/Labor

There are many ways you can increase labor in your business. The obvious is hiring employees.  Beyond employees, there are many more options than you might first think:

  • Contractors, where you have a contract for a particular job and meet all of the IRS and other compliance requirements
  • Temp workers, where you “lease” an employee who stays on the temp agency payroll or hire them outright with a limited term of employment.
  • Part-time workers on your payroll
  • Companies that you outsource the work to and contract with as vendors to provide a particular service. They may outsource your labor needs or simply have labor as a component of the product or service you have contracted them to supply.
  • PEO, or professional employer organizations, act as a client’s employer and hire their employees as well as manage payroll and other HR compliance tasks.
  • Interns, which are unpaid positions. Check your state and local rules for laws regarding hiring interns.
  • Volunteers.  This is common if you have a nonprofit organization.

With all of these options available, it should be a bit easier to find ways to add labor and grow your business.

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Direct vs. Indirect Costs (and Why You Should Care)

If you’re a business owner who wants to continually find ways to increase your profitability, then you’ll want to learn about direct and indirect costs. Breaking out your expenses into direct and indirect categories can help you arrive at the most profitable volume of sales for your business.

Direct Expenses

Expenses that fall into the direct cost category are ones that relate directly to the items you sell. Here are some examples.

  • If you have a flower shop, the cost of the flowers is a direct cost. So is the cost of vases, ribbons, cards, and the labor to put the arrangements together.
  • If you are a law firm, the labor and any materials or supplies spent on serving a client is a direct cost.
  • If you own a pool building company, the costs of the concrete, tiles, filter, pump, and labor to build the pool are direct costs.
  • If you run a toy store, the purchase of the toys is a direct cost.

Direct expenses, unlike indirect expenses, will vary proportionally to the volume of items you sell. The more you sell, the higher your direct expenses. The less you sell, the lower your direct expenses.

In general, direct expenses should be recorded in Cost of Goods Sold. You can get your Gross Profit figure by calculating Sales less Cost of Goods Sold (or COGS). Gross Profit Margin is an important percentage to know in your business. It is computed as follows: (Sales – COGS) / Sales.

Some small service companies might not bother to break out labor into direct and indirect on the Profit and Loss statement each month, but it can be useful to break out periodically or when you are re-evaluating your pricing and profitability.

Direct expenses are important in making pricing decisions, but so are indirect expenses.

Indirect Expenses

Indirect expenses are expenses that you need to incur to run your business, but are not directly related to the items you sell.  Here are some examples:

  • Telephone
  • Rent
  • Insurance
  • Utilities such as electricity, gas, water, and garbage pickup
  • Administrative labor, such as a receptionist or supervisor
  • Education and training
  • Professional services, such as legal, HR, IT, or accounting
  • Office supplies
  • Hardware and software
  • Business permits

Fixed and Variable Costs

Direct and indirect costs can each be further broken down into fixed and variable costs. For example, HR expenses, education, and training will go up as you sell more and hire more workers. That makes them variable costs.

Other indirect expenses will remain flat no matter what your sales volume is, such as rent. That means they are fixed costs.

Pricing Your Items

When calculating your sales prices, use direct costs to be sure your profit margin is high enough to cover an allocation of your indirect expenses.  In other words, sales price should always cover all direct costs plus a profit component, plus enough to cover indirect costs when considering the volume of your sales.

The lower your sales volume, the higher the price per item should be. A higher sales volume gives you more room to spread out your indirect costs over more sales. That leads to either higher profits, or you can lower your price to be more competitive.

If you have questions about direct and indirect costs or want help validating your pricing decisions, please feel free to reach out any time.

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How to Better Track Your Carbon Footprint

You may already be doing your part to help save the planet. From recycling to driving electric cars, to avoiding the use of plastic bottles and carrying reusable bags to the grocery store, there are myriad ways for all of us to make a difference—both big and small. However, it may be important to stop and ask ourselves: Are we currently doing enough?   

If you have considered pursuing an even more sustainable lifestyle, guess what? There’s an app for that! Actually, there are a few different apps to help you accomplish the goal of tracking your carbon footprint. In doing so, you can physically see your carbon environmental impact.

Below, we have detailed some of these apps and their benefits. Take a look! If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to reach out.

Capture

Capture is an app that calculates users’ monthly CO2 targets by asking a series of questions. These questions include things like, “How many flights a year do you take?” and “What kind of diet do you adhere to?” Capture also utilizes GPS tracking to predict emissions from transportation.

Specifically, the app was designed to not only make planet-friendly living possible, but also make the process easy—or, easier—for those interested. With the capture app, users can conveniently “track, reduce, and remove CO2 emissions from everyday life.”

Interestingly, the app can be used single-handedly or with colleagues. If you are a numbers person who likes measuring and tracking, Capture is for you.

Almond

UK-based, Almond’s mission is simple: to help as many people reach Net Zero carbon emissions as possible, and in just four easy steps:

  1. Understand your carbon footprint
  2. Discover responsible brands
  3. Earn offset coins when you make a switch
  4. Offset your carbon footprint

Almond allows you to scan products to not only learn about that particular item’s story but also see what’s in the product (i.e., if it’s environmentally-friendly). Then, you can earn money with crypto rewards to plant and protect trees, which offset your carbon footprint. The more you earn, the faster you can grow your forest to achieve a carbon-balanced lifestyle and reach your personal CO2 Net Zero.

Pawprint

Pawprint allows individuals to fight climate change in the palm of their hands. This online tool helps to measure, understand, and reduce your carbon footprint.

Known as the “Eco companion,” this app delivers the following:

  • Science-based data you can trust
  • Carbon-reducing tips and challenges that suit your particular lifestyle
  • Better insight into how your carbon footprint measures up to the rest of the UK (this app is also UK-based)

One factor that sets Pawprint apart from other carbon footprint tracking apps, is that all of its data is validated by Mike Berners-Lee’s Small World Consulting, an expert in the industry.

Of course, there are plenty of other smartphone apps and tools available to help you better track and reduce your carbon footprint, including The Extra Mile, My Planet, and Carbon Footprint. The trick is to find the app or tool that works best for you and your lifestyle.

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Five Accounting Reports You Don’t Want to Be Without

While we all have to keep our monthly books up to date for tax and other compliance reporting purposes, we should never stop there. Your books hold a wealth of information that you can use to run your business better.  Here are five reports you should never be without.

Budget-to-Actual Profit and Loss Statement

Hopefully, you’ve already seen how powerful the Profit and Loss Statement is. Let’s take it a deeper level and add budget comparison to it.  With this addition, you can plan your way toward the sales and profit figures you want. You’ll know every month whether you’re on track, ahead of the game (give yourself five stars!), or need to hustle to make it up next month.

Most accounting systems allow you to enter monthly budget numbers for your sales and expense accounts.  You can enter them at the beginning of each year and adjust them throughout the year. It’s kind of like having Google Maps on a cross-country journey. You will be able to see where there is construction and traffic, so you can take another route. You can also see where there are cool places to stop, so you can take advantage of the fun. Your numbers tell a story.

Actual-to-Prior-Year Profit and Loss Statement

This is an easy report to generate, assuming you have at least two years’ worth of information in your accounting system. This report allows you to compare your business’s results for this year with how you did last year.  Are you ahead? Behind? Have new products and services? New employees?  New expenses?

With this comparison, you can take action based on how you would like your business to perform this year versus last year. While this report is readily available, few businesses study it to glean the insights available, so be sure to spend some time analyzing the data in this report.

Sales by Item, Customer, or Division (or All Three)

Inside every business’s sales information is a treasure trove of possibility. Where are you seeing growth, and how can you capitalize on it? Where do you see a slowdown, and can you run a promotion to juice things up?

Choose the breakout – customer, item, division, or another – that is meaningful to your business type. If possible, arrange for a searchable database so you can drill down into the detail even more. What trends do you see?  What opportunities do you see?

Operations Reports   

To find out more about your profitability and to get into the details of how your expenses are matching up with your sales, you need to review your operational accounting reports. The exact report will depend on the type of your business.  If you are in services, you’ll need payroll reports and time sheets. If you are in retail, you’ll need inventory reports. If you are in construction, you’ll need job cost reports. And if you are in manufacturing, you’ll need cost of goods sold and other reports to evaluate assembly and production efficiency.

Cash Reports

The last report that is essential for good business management is all about cash. There is more than one option here, and these reports can include Accounts Receivable Aging, Accounts Payable Aging, cash flow forecasting, and various cash flow reports.

If you grant customers credit, you’ll want to actively make sure that money is collected on time from clients. If customer balances get too old, action must be taken. Even if you don’t grant credit, transactions such as returns, expired credit cards, and bounced checks need special attention.

The same is true for amounts you owe to vendors, with the Accounts Payable Aging report.

If you run tight with your cash balance, you may want to have a cash flow forecasting report on hand. This report gives you good warning as to when your bank balance may dip below your needs.  You can then delay vendor payments or find an infusion of cash to cover the shortfall.

With these five categories of reports, you will have dozens of opportunities to be proactive about running your business and improving your results.  And if we can help you find or generate them, please reach out anytime.

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Re-Imagining Your Chart of Accounts

The Chart of Accounts is the backbone of your accounting records. It is a list of all of the accounts – bank, loan, asset, revenue, and expense – in your General Ledger, which holds all of your accounting transactions.

Think of your Chart of Accounts as a collection of buckets that hold dollars of items related to your business. Each bucket should be meaningful and have a purpose. For example, if you have three checking accounts, you need three buckets on your Chart of Accounts to hold the transactions for each bank account.  It would not make any sense to have more or less than exactly one bucket for each checking account.

While it’s standard to have certain buckets or accounts for assets, liabilities, and equity, the number of buckets that you create for revenue and expenses can vary greatly from company to company.  It makes sense to create and design your accounts for what you need for tax, accounting, and decision-making purposes in your business.

Let’s say you are a hair stylist.  Do you want your revenue to be in one big bucket? That’s all that Uncle Sam requires. But for decision-making purposes, you may want to break out men’s and women’s services, or cuts versus color and other treatments, or both. In that case, you would have four revenue accounts: men’s cuts, men’s color, women’s cuts, and women’s color.  This type of detail would help you see where your revenue is highest so that you can better manage your supplies as well as target your marketing to that group.

Having certain expense accounts matched to the tax requirements can reduce extra work at tax time. For example, separating travel costs – hotel and airfare – from meals and entertainment is a common one, as is keeping meals and entertainment separate.

The goal is to get your Chart of Accounts working for you. If, when you first set up your accounting system, you accepted the default Chart of Accounts, it may be time to redesign and restructure the list so it serves your needs better. Here are some additional considerations.

  • What revenue or expenses do you want to watch more carefully? Should they be broken out in more detail?  You can also use subaccounts to group transactions.
  • Is there cleanup work to do due to misspelling or other duplication?
  • Have you interviewed all the financial information users in your company to see how they need the data organized?
  • What spreadsheets could be eliminated if the Chart of Accounts was better organized?
  • Does your Chart of Accounts support your budgeting process? If two people are responsible for controlling spending from one account, would it be useful to break it out?
  • Do you have too many accounts?  Or too few?  (Most people have too many due to poor data entry hygiene.)
  • Are you properly using other categorizing features in the accounting system, such as classes, divisions, and custom fields?
  • What reports could produce better information for taking profit-focused actions in your business if the Chart of Accounts stored the transactions differently?
  • How could key performance indicators be better linked to the Chart of Accounts?

These questions can help you begin thinking about how your Chart of Accounts can better serve you.  After all, it’s your business, your accounting system, and your Chart of Accounts.

And if we can help you through the redesign process, please let us know.

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Clubhouse: The New Kid in Town

Are you familiar with Clubhouse? This social media platform is still pretty new, but currently picking up steam. Perhaps one of the easiest ways to describe Clubhouse is like this: When you were a kid, did you ever hold a glass to a wall with your ear glued to it in order to hear the conversation in the next room? Clubhouse is kind of like that, only scaled and organized.

Clubhouse is an audio-only platform where you can start a room based on a topic and others can join the room and conversation. You can bring people up to the “stage” who have raised their hand. The platform supports multiple languages, and at any one time, you can see rooms in Russian, Spanish, Mandarin, German, Japanese, English, and many more.

Think of Clubhouse this way: It’s like an interactive live podcast. The platform hosts both personal and business conversations, so there is a lot of noise to wade through, but that’s true of every social app. Many people love the lack of video that is so pervasive on other platforms.

The main newsfeed in Clubhouse shows active rooms that you might like. To join a room, just click anywhere on the room description. Once in a room, you should hear the speakers talking, or you might hear music if it’s a concert. You are muted until you are invited on stage.

In a room, everyone can see everyone else’s avatar. Clicking on other people’s avatars is encouraged and brings up a bio and direct links to the person’s Twitter and Instagram accounts.  You have lots of space on Clubhouse to build an extensive bio, and this is primarily how other people in the room can get to know you, along with hearing what you have to say if you participate.

Clubhouse is an entirely new and fresh way to market your business and let people know about your products and services.

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